Top 3 Recording Book Suggestions ?

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restless-young-romantic
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Top 3 Recording Book Suggestions ?

Post by restless-young-romantic » Mon Dec 26, 2005 3:08 pm

What are the Must haves ?

(I have the handbook, Swedien, and Katz books on my short list)

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Brett Siler
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Post by Brett Siler » Mon Dec 26, 2005 3:38 pm

Mixing with your Mind by Micheal Paul Stravrou

Modern Recording By David Miles Hubner

I learned a lot from those two books and are two that are must have.

I have the Mixing Engineers handbook, it is cool and it had a few helpful things in there, not a totally nessicary book but it is good.

I was going to check out "The Art of Mixing" and see if that was any good...

I want to get the Tape Op book as well.

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Post by drumsound » Mon Dec 26, 2005 4:29 pm

"Behind the Glass" is good because it's a bunch of wide ranging interviews with some really great engineers and producers.

"Temples of Sound" is a neat history of some great studios.

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Post by rolandk » Mon Dec 26, 2005 4:59 pm

'Sound Reinforcement Handbook' by Yamaha
'Recording Guitar and Bass' by Huw Price
Owners manuals of the gear you have
my band: Mission 5

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Post by cgarges » Mon Dec 26, 2005 5:36 pm

InvalidInk wrote:Mixing with your Mind by Micheal Paul Stravrou
Holy crap is that a good book!
drumsound wrote:"Temples of Sound" is a neat history of some great studios.
Even better is Studio Stories by David Simons. What great book on the history of the NY recording scene from the 50s to the 80s. More than just an account of what artists worked in which studios.

I still wish someone would write a studio history book with actual pictures of the studios. Did no one ever take photographs of studios before 1990 or what?

Along those lines, there is a great book on the history of Abbey Road by Brian Southall, Peter Vince, and Allan Rouse. Terrific pictures and great studio stories.

Inside Classic Rock Tracks by Rikky Rooksby is an interesting book as well.

I also have an affinity for Sound Advice by Wayne Wadhams.

And of course, the TapeOp book.

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Post by Evergreen » Mon Dec 26, 2005 5:47 pm

I would say:

Yamaha Sound Reinforcement Handbook

Behind the Glass

Creative Recording Part 1: Effects and Processors by Paul White

The Recording Engineer's Handbook by Bobby Owsinski

and the Tape Op book is awesome.

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Post by I'm Painting Again » Mon Dec 26, 2005 6:07 pm

Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz: On the Sensations of Tone (1870)

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Post by Brett Siler » Tue Dec 27, 2005 10:37 pm

cgarges wrote:
InvalidInk wrote:Mixing with your Mind by Micheal Paul Stravrou
Holy crap is that a good book!
Yeah It is I bought that over a year ago and I am still soaking it up. It is definiatly worth they high price (for a book). He approaches recording much different than other books, he never say "put a mic 6-8 inches from the speaker", but rather listen techniques that really work! This book really stepped up my records a lot.

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Post by cgarges » Wed Dec 28, 2005 5:44 am

InvalidInk wrote:Yeah It is I bought that over a year ago and I am still soaking it up. It is definiatly worth they high price (for a book). He approaches recording much different than other books, he never say "put a mic 6-8 inches from the speaker", but rather listen techniques that really work! This book really stepped up my records a lot.
What was interesting to me about it was that the book was full of stuff that I've been doing for years, but it explains things really well and gives you a lot to think about. It's cerebral, but then again, not. There's some of it I still don't necessarily apply, but I like the description of digital (the skyscraper metaphor) and the mic technique stuff. I've also applied things like the "mix the draggy guy lower" and "make a stereo piano mono, then stereo again" and had really interesting results that have just about saved the mixes. What a great book!

Chris Garges
Charlotte, NC

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Brett Siler
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Post by Brett Siler » Wed Dec 28, 2005 9:28 am

cgarges wrote:It's cerebral, but then again, not.
Exactly, it's really smart but it doesn't intimidate you at all and its not overly technical. It really breaks it down makes you realize that you can make some good interesting recordings, if you just listen and not try to forumlize things. At least thats the main gist I got out of it. Anyway, everyone get this book!

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Post by Russian Recording » Wed Dec 28, 2005 6:25 pm

"Mastering Audio" by Bob Katz is the most informational and useful book I have ever read on audio. And it is VERY readable and down to earth while providing a wealth of knowledge that even the most experiences engineer could benefit from. I've read through it 2 times straight, and both times were just as useful. Im due for a 3rd read through. I know it sounds weird, but once you read it you'll see.

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Post by surf's up » Wed Dec 28, 2005 11:03 pm

I just got done reading the highly regarded Handbook of Acoustics by F. Alton Everest. It gets pretty technical but illuminates just how much the space you record in affects your recordings. I would think its a great reference if youre in the process (or need some prompting to undertake the process) of improving your room(s). But it also gets into so many aspects of sound, psychoacoustics, reverb, and other things that would be seem to be worthwhile knowledge for anyone working in audio.

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Post by happybeat » Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:52 am

try Less Is More - essentials of record production and recording, by Fran Ashcroft.

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Post by Doublehelix » Thu Dec 29, 2005 9:35 am

1) Mixing with your mind - Stravrou

2) Mastering Audio - Katz

Both great reads, and "must haves" in my studio!

I am anxious to get "Behind the Glass", and will probably pick that one up sometime soon.
DH

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-Yogi Berra

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mixing with your mind

Post by ideaofnorth » Tue Jan 17, 2006 10:21 am

anyone know where I can find this book? looks to be out of print, amazon & powells had no listing.

Thanks!

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