compressor for drum overheads?

Recording Techniques, People Skills, Gear, Recording Spaces, Computers, and DIY

Moderators: drumsound, tomb

Post Reply
mus1k_freak
alignin' 24-trk
Posts: 65
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2006 6:58 pm
Contact:

compressor for drum overheads?

Post by mus1k_freak » Tue Aug 15, 2006 11:21 am

Hey just wondering what if any compressor you guys are usuing for drum overheads my set up is a pair akg 414's into a ADL600 which is awesome, though i dont have any good outboard compressors that are 2 channel, just wondering what some of you guys like to use for drums
doctors practice, musicians perform

User avatar
Russian Recording
re-cappin' neve
Posts: 752
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 2:28 pm
Location: Bloomington, IN
Contact:

Post by Russian Recording » Tue Aug 15, 2006 1:18 pm

i very, very rarely compress overheads unless the damn snare is too loud, in which case I will use a BSS DPR402 or RNC in normal mode, with a fast attack and release to prevent it from blaring out and annoying the fuck out of me. Otherwise, I like 'em the way they are.

best,
mike

DaViDB112
pluggin' in mics
Posts: 39
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2004 2:03 am

Post by DaViDB112 » Wed Aug 16, 2006 7:26 am

i love compressing the overheads. I have used aN RNC in the past with good results. I have two old DBX-160 VU type which i love on the overheads.
it is worth experimenting with even though you may only need a little bit.

mpedrummer
steve albini likes it
Posts: 335
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2003 3:28 pm
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Contact:

Post by mpedrummer » Wed Aug 16, 2006 8:32 pm

My absolute favorite (which I cannot afford, alas) is the Summit DCL-200. I miss that thing...

Second best (that I've experienced) would be the Waves RennComp. Mainly because that's the closest I've heard to the Summit DCL-200.

For aggressive stuff, I'm also partial to the LA2A model for the UAD-1 card.

MPEDrummer

User avatar
Slider
george martin
Posts: 1486
Joined: Mon Aug 25, 2003 2:00 pm

Post by Slider » Wed Aug 16, 2006 9:22 pm

I like an 1178.

drumsound
zen recordist
Posts: 6875
Joined: Tue Jun 01, 2004 10:30 pm
Location: Bloomington IL
Contact:

Post by drumsound » Wed Aug 16, 2006 9:43 pm

I just mixed a couple songs with the ART VLA on the OH to try to tame the drummer's cymbal technique.

User avatar
dokushoka
buyin' a studio
Posts: 811
Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2004 8:37 pm
Location: San Francisco / L.A.
Contact:

Post by dokushoka » Wed Aug 16, 2006 11:53 pm

For 'exciting' sounding overheads, 1178 with a fast release. For 'gelled' sounds a 33609, any revision, or, something like a VariMu for slower tempo stuff.

The new protools compressor can actually work quite well, too.

User avatar
Doublehelix
takin' a dinner break
Posts: 172
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 5:59 pm
Location: USA
Contact:

Post by Doublehelix » Fri Aug 18, 2006 7:18 am

I also never use a compressor on OHs... and if the snare is bleeding into the OHs to much, I would think that compression would just bring it out more.
DH

"Nobody goes there anymore; it's too crowded."
-Yogi Berra

User avatar
dokushoka
buyin' a studio
Posts: 811
Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2004 8:37 pm
Location: San Francisco / L.A.
Contact:

Post by dokushoka » Fri Aug 18, 2006 12:48 pm

Doublehelix wrote:I also never use a compressor on OHs... and if the snare is bleeding into the OHs to much, I would think that compression would just bring it out more.
I generally find that the LOUDER you can get the snare in the overheads, the better. The single most important part of getting a convincing drum sound IS the overheads. When I compress them, generally, what I am listening for is getting the snare to release in a more "snappy" way while still keeping the decay of the cymbals sounding somewhat natural. Its really hard for me to explain this.

I find that if I rely on the overheads to get the "body" of the snare and the toms, I end up in much better shape than if I rely on the close mics.

jmpizzoferrato
gettin' sounds
Posts: 141
Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2003 12:05 am
Location: northampton, Massachusetts
Contact:

comp ohs

Post by jmpizzoferrato » Fri Aug 18, 2006 10:54 pm

the only time i compress overheads is when the cymbals are just too out of hand. that has all to do with the drummer in my opinion. i've had a lot of luck with a tube tech LCA2B.

if i'm going for a 'compressed' sound then a good neve comp (don't know which number) will do. 1176s have been good as well.

in my little studio, i have an ashly cl-50 that surprisingly musical and smooth! for real! i love that thing. it's not the cleanest but it really does the job gracefully.

User avatar
Doublehelix
takin' a dinner break
Posts: 172
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 5:59 pm
Location: USA
Contact:

Post by Doublehelix » Sun Aug 20, 2006 8:15 am

dokushoka wrote:
Doublehelix wrote:I also never use a compressor on OHs... and if the snare is bleeding into the OHs to much, I would think that compression would just bring it out more.
I generally find that the LOUDER you can get the snare in the overheads, the better. The single most important part of getting a convincing drum sound IS the overheads. When I compress them, generally, what I am listening for is getting the snare to release in a more "snappy" way while still keeping the decay of the cymbals sounding somewhat natural. Its really hard for me to explain this.

I find that if I rely on the overheads to get the "body" of the snare and the toms, I end up in much better shape than if I rely on the close mics.

I was refering to Russian Recording's comment in his post where he said:

"i very, very rarely compress overheads unless the damn snare is too loud, in which case I will use a BSS DPR402 or RNC in normal mode, with a fast attack and release to prevent it from blaring out and annoying the f out of me. Otherwise, I like 'em the way they are."
DH

"Nobody goes there anymore; it's too crowded."
-Yogi Berra

Professor
ghost haunting audio students
Posts: 3307
Joined: Wed May 07, 2003 2:11 pm
Location: I have arrived... but where the hell am I?

Post by Professor » Mon Aug 21, 2006 2:23 am

I pretty much always compress drum overheads, but like everything for me, it tends to be light compression applied in mix-down - never on the way in. Usually for overheads it's the console compressors at work (Yamaha DM-2000 ) because they are very clean, effective, and they link together easier than routing through a stereo bus in ProTools. The typical settings will give a little squeeze to just slightly narrow the dynamic range and bring up the detail & presence, though I will squeeze a little harder if I'm dealing with a paricularly broad dynamic range. If I am using plug-ins within ProTools, I'll usually reach for the BF-1176 and lately I've been liking Digi's new "Maxim" limiter plug. But it's almost always just various settings on the board compressors.

-Jeremy

User avatar
dokushoka
buyin' a studio
Posts: 811
Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2004 8:37 pm
Location: San Francisco / L.A.
Contact:

Post by dokushoka » Mon Aug 21, 2006 4:46 am

I REALLY find that compressing the overheads with proper attack and release is pretty much the most important factor in getting a nice drum sound. The compression stabilizes the stereo image, brings up the snare and some nice ambience (if the room is decent), helps bring the brass in closer to the snare so you can turn UP the overheads and give the drums some shimmer and get the snare hammering away. Really great stuff. I find that if I don't compress overs, for most genres, including jazz (to an extent) the brass tends to get washy and the drums lack "focus" to me. I rarely go for an obviously compressed sound (except for some rock stuff) but more for a subtle "thickening." I sometimes am pulling down over 6db.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 27 guests