Dudes who record a lot of metal

Recording Techniques, People Skills, Gear, Recording Spaces, Computers, and DIY

Moderators: drumsound, tomb

User avatar
farview
tinnitus
Posts: 1204
Joined: Tue Aug 31, 2004 1:42 pm
Location: St. Charles (chicago) IL
Contact:

Post by farview » Fri May 02, 2008 12:45 pm

First you start with a metal drummer. This guy will hopefully show up with the right heads and hard beaters. That is the big thing with getting the sound. You can get that sound with a D112, B52, D6, 421, etc... as long as the drummer shows up with the right equipment and does his job.

Mic all the drums individually and also mic the hat and ride.

The drums need to be bright and deep. Compress them hard.

tomberdude
pushin' record
Posts: 227
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2007 5:18 pm

Post by tomberdude » Fri May 02, 2008 6:33 pm

farview wrote:First you start with a metal drummer. This guy will hopefully show up with the right heads and hard beaters. That is the big thing with getting the sound.
Agreed.
You can get that sound with a D112, B52, D6, 421, etc... as long as the drummer shows up with the right equipment and does his job.
A good way of helping the drummer do his job is to boost the hi-hat, ride, and OH mics in his phones. They tend to hold back on whatever is loud in the phones...
Mic all the drums individually and also mic the hat and ride.
See above.
The drums need to be bright and deep. Compress them hard.


Also, parallel buss compression may be something you would like to check out. In PT, I route the out of each actual DRUM track (no cymbals or room mic) to a stereo buss (Bus 1-2). make a new stereo aux track that has the same input (Bus 1-2), but with a different comp. HIGH ratio, fast attack, and slow release.

User avatar
RedCrownStudios
pushin' record
Posts: 221
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2008 6:28 pm
Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma
Contact:

Post by RedCrownStudios » Fri May 02, 2008 9:58 pm

Hola brother,

I dont really like recording metal bands, but when I do, I often replace kicks,snare, and toms. I use drumagogs midi out feature to trigger addictive drums. I have my own presets already made up for metal bands.

But, you can easily get the same snappy kick etc from any eq and a good mic.

My favorite mic i own that I use for rock/metal bands is my audix d6.

EQ-wise

I think that the kick is the biggest thing that makes for that "metal" sound. I included some pics below to illustrate what I do to get a snappy kick.

Image

Image

Image[/img]

If you have an eq where you can dial in specific frequencies thats best. the 1st pic has the best example of frequencies to notch but i included the others as well since i didnt know weather you'd be doing it digitally or on your outboard mixer.

Here are some mp3s I made real quick illustrating what this particular eq curve will sound like. This way if you dont like it you wont waste your time.

(Please right click and download them instead of streaming them please)

The first mp3 is just my drums recorded dry,
http://www.redcrowncompany.com/mp3/kit-no-eq.mp3

the second is with the kick eq'd per the curve above
http://www.redcrowncompany.com/mp3/kit-w-eq.mp3

Also, compression is your friend, but please dont do it to the point that they are "pumping", i hate that sound.

Good luck!

(P.S. - Im tired so I hope that made sense)
Marshall Baker
Media Designer
Tulsa, Ok
www.MarshallBaker.com
www.MarshallandRoxy.com

User avatar
Brett Siler
moves faders with mind
Posts: 2506
Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2003 12:16 pm
Location: Evansville, IN
Contact:

Post by Brett Siler » Fri May 02, 2008 10:16 pm

I would recommend listening to Ulver

User avatar
RedCrownStudios
pushin' record
Posts: 221
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2008 6:28 pm
Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma
Contact:

Post by RedCrownStudios » Sat May 03, 2008 12:09 am

Eep! :oops:

I just had my speakers muted when I went to that youtube link and unmuted a few seconds into the song.


I have just soiled myself.

(poop)
Marshall Baker
Media Designer
Tulsa, Ok
www.MarshallBaker.com
www.MarshallandRoxy.com

Bryantx512
gettin' sounds
Posts: 109
Joined: Wed May 23, 2007 1:56 pm
Location: Georgetown, TX

Post by Bryantx512 » Sat May 03, 2008 8:49 am

Ouch. I think I shredded an ear drum.

User avatar
blackdiscoball
suffering 'studio suck'
Posts: 469
Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2005 5:32 pm

Post by blackdiscoball » Sat May 03, 2008 4:06 pm

Im new to recording metal as well and I can say listening to metal is a great way of getting your head around it. I have found a couple good bands that I would casually listen to even if it wasnt "homework". You really cant speak their language without knowing it, and the best way to learn is to listen.

Bryantx512
gettin' sounds
Posts: 109
Joined: Wed May 23, 2007 1:56 pm
Location: Georgetown, TX

Post by Bryantx512 » Sat May 03, 2008 4:38 pm

I would recommend listening to Killswitch Engage, Soilwork, or Shadows Fall. I think these bands have really descent production.

User avatar
farview
tinnitus
Posts: 1204
Joined: Tue Aug 31, 2004 1:42 pm
Location: St. Charles (chicago) IL
Contact:

Post by farview » Sat May 03, 2008 6:46 pm

The best thing to do is ask the band to bring in a few CDs that they like the production on. That will give you a big hint to where they are going.

There is a big difference between Shadows Fall, Nile, Dummu Borgir, Nickelback, Metallica, etc...

Metal has so many sub-genres it will make your head spin. All of them have different production styles. If you give a death metal band a doom metal production, you could be their next sacrifice.

tomberdude
pushin' record
Posts: 227
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2007 5:18 pm

Post by tomberdude » Sat May 03, 2008 10:40 pm

farview wrote:The best thing to do is ask the band to bring in a few CDs that they like the production on. That will give you a big hint to where they are going.

There is a big difference between Shadows Fall, Nile, Dummu Borgir, Nickelback, Metallica, etc...

Metal has so many sub-genres it will make your head spin. All of them have different production styles. If you give a death metal band a doom metal production, you could be their next sacrifice.
1. Nickelback?????????? Really!!?!? :x

2. Yeah. Reference CD's are great. I've been introduced to many awesome bands I never would have heard otherwise, but too many reference CD's for one mix can be tiresome. I once had a reference cd given to me for every part of the drumkit on top of references for guitars, bass, keyboard... Damn.

-rl

User avatar
farview
tinnitus
Posts: 1204
Joined: Tue Aug 31, 2004 1:42 pm
Location: St. Charles (chicago) IL
Contact:

Post by farview » Sun May 04, 2008 7:52 am

Destroy Big Brother wrote: 1. Nickelback?????????? Really!!?!? :x
Well, that was half a joke. But there are some people that would call anything with heavy guitars "metal". They are heavier than Poison ever was, and those guys get lumped into the 'metal' catagory.
Destroy Big Brother wrote: 2. Yeah. Reference CD's are great. I've been introduced to many awesome bands I never would have heard otherwise, but too many reference CD's for one mix can be tiresome. I once had a reference cd given to me for every part of the drumkit on top of references for guitars, bass, keyboard... Damn.-rl
That's when you have to explain that certain sounds will mix together with others, some won't.

I normally find that there is a common thread running through all the reference CDs, that is what I focus on capturing.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 32 guests