Hybrid studio/home recording

Recording Techniques, People Skills, Gear, Recording Spaces, Computers, and DIY

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MoreSpaceEcho
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Post by MoreSpaceEcho » Wed May 06, 2009 10:34 am

subatomic pieces wrote: there's no need to present a counter argument because jeff hasn't ever actually engaged in a constructive argument here.
FYP.

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Brett Siler
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Post by Brett Siler » Wed May 06, 2009 12:30 pm

ipressrecord wrote: I personally went to recording school (liberal arts music/recording degree) in the 1990s and feel like I didn't learn shit... I mean anything... until I was out working on my own making records, reading and experimenting, picking people's brains, etc. I spent three years in college as a broadcast engineer for our teleconference facilities, a year tracking voice talent professionally (out of college), two years doing live sound/AV work, and years doing sales-related pro audio work. I interned for a big studio in Philly for three days and felt that it was a waste of my time (I was 29 at the time and out of work, so I got a job doing live sound instead) due to studio politics, seeing where folks were who had been there for over 5 years, etc. I simply decided to record for fun and extra cash and make the best records I can with what I had at the time, chose a place with low rent, and bought a shitload of good gear. And I've been totally working hard and really enjoying recording for the past six years, which is about the time that I stepped up to a more professional setup, better mics, monitoring, etc. And feverishly reading TapeOp and the TOMB.

I guess to sum this last statement up about my background, if you take all of my experience prior to 2002, my only real "professional studio experience" was making message/music on-hold productions with an SM7, an Otari 1/4" deck, a Soundcraft board, music bed library, Sound Forge / Cool Edit, and professional voice talent for 14 months. No guitars, no drums, you get the picture.

Anyway, I have met (even recently) folks who write/perform/record their own stuff and some of it sounds amazing. Really great sounds on half-decent gear. Recorded in bedrooms, closets, bathrooms, etc. Sure, there is a lot of shit out here, but it seems that some of my favorite records in the past few years have been made by artists, not engineers, and have been home-brewed. No pro engineering experience at all, just trial and error.

Jeff
This is pretty much exactly where I'm coming from. I have a degree in Audio Recording, but while at school I felt like I didn't really learn much. It was more when I dove in on my own and got some real first hand experience. I worked at a studio at the front of desk for awhile and sat in on sessions but like like ipressrecord's experience it was a waste of time. I have learned way more by doing stuff on my own and reading TOMB and Tape Op mag than I did at college and a "real studio" with combined. I have come a long way in the past 7 years! I think one can learn a whole lot by just starting where ever they are with whatever they have. My first album was recorded on an answering machine, and it sound pretty balanced for recording live to an answering machine. It reminds me of how I also started playing music, I didn't know shit about it, but I really liked it and really wanted to do, so I did. I didn't take lessons, I just sat with a boom box and figured out punk songs instead of worrying about scales, theory, song structure ect. Just use what you have and make sound as best as you possible can and keep learning.

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Post by junkstar » Tue May 12, 2009 9:32 am

ipressrecord wrote: I personally went to recording school (liberal arts music/recording degree) in the 1990s and feel like I didn't learn shit... I mean anything... until I was out working on my own making records, reading and experimenting, picking people's brains, etc.
I went to audio school in the 90's too and feel like I learned a lot. Simple stuff like cleaning up after myself at the end of a session (coiling cables, normal the board), EQ techniques, editing magnetic tape (which helped with editing in general) to name a few. When I came home to my 4 track and etc, I was more effective, more daring, interested to try everything.

I think the most important next step was hiring pros to record my band after gaining all of that knowledge and watching them work and learning from their process, asking questions, helping. It was at that point that I started to produce and get geared up. It all fell together.

Last step was this board and the good people here, and the magazine. Helped me fine tune as I entered my 3rd phase. Strategizing my 4th phase now...

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