Short short run Digipaks?

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kslight
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Post by kslight » Sun Sep 29, 2013 9:00 am

DrummerMan wrote: I feel like homemade cd-rs with computer printed labels tend get filed under "doesn't have their act together", at least that's what I get from the looks on their faces.
In the kind of volume you're talking, everything is going to be a "homemade" CD-R of sorts. At that level all companies will be using some form of inkjet direct to disc printer (hopefully, as labels look cheesy as hell). Any inside booklet/etc will be produced on some kind of laser printer, not dissimilar to what someone like Kinko's will use.

Getting a digipak produced is probably not realistic, or at least you'd have to inquire with someone that actually makes those (but I imagine their minimums will kill). Making a normal jewel case is more economical in small runs.

If you can get 50 for $200 I'd say that's pretty fair and likely as good as you will get.


When I used to have a band that gigged locally we were DIY. I have an Epson printer that prints direct to discs, and I'd buy the CD-Rs that are made for that (you can get white finish or silver, I prefer the look of silver). I have a big box full of die-cut chipboard CD sleeves that I would use (which would be expensive as hell to get done, but I acquired them from someone else). I also work in the printing industry, so I printed out a color label and stuck it on the front of the chipboard sleeve, and then I printed out a color insert and stuck it with the disc. Between the cost of the printer, discs, ink, and time to produce...by the time I made 50 discs I'm sure I was out over $200. But that is another option.

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Gregg Juke
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Post by Gregg Juke » Sun Sep 29, 2013 3:05 pm

Really good point-- Even the major manufacturers that are still extant will be doing short runs on short run equipment, not with the same machinery and processes they use for large runs of 1,000 or more...

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Gregg Juke
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Post by Gregg Juke » Sun Sep 29, 2013 3:26 pm

PS-- A few tricks... Labels don't have to look cheesey. It's all in the design and font choices, and in marrying the right label with the right CD, for instance clear labels with silver CD's, white glossy label with white CD's, etc. I released a comp a few years back (dad-gum, it was actually the early 2000's I guess), and we did use ink-jet on-disc printing, but we didn't want the bottom of the CD's to "look burned." We were able to find a source for CD-R's that were silver on top, but totally black on the bottom/read side, so you couldn't see anything else on the CD at all and it looked very pro. Also, we had made an "enhanced CD" with auto-run photos and liner-notes on the disc, plus we had a pretty big insert with printed liner-notes, so we used DVD cases instead of jewel boxes. It looked cool, and was actually cheaper than ordering jewel cases/shells.

Some folks did complain about the packaging not fitting on the shelf the same way the rest of their discs did, but another benefit was that our packaging stood-out (literally taller) than other discs in the store bins, so we didn't have to do top-spine stickers. Something to consider if you decide to try and sell physical product through local stores.

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terryb
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Post by terryb » Sun Sep 29, 2013 6:00 pm

I've used kunaki and you can have as few as 1 copy made. They look professional, full color on disk and insert/back/spine. It's duplication cdr. Not the highest quality, but i've had no problems at all. I mean, you can have just one or two profesisonal looking, shrink wrapped copies made. Just cannot be beat.
I'd rather diy, but who's got the time?

I just finished mixing a new album and will have the copies made via kunaki

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jgimbel
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Post by jgimbel » Sun Sep 29, 2013 10:49 pm

dfuruta wrote:Just want to say, the samples I got from Sire Press looked really bad - the printing was fine, but the packages weren't cut or glued very well at all.
Very strange. I've been doing graphic design (especially album artwork) for musicians for years, I've had at least a dozen projects that we've used Sire Press for (both printed and screen printed, one was for a Tape Op member, at that) and always had great results. Not all packages are totally perfect, but I've never had any place I've worked with give 100% perfect packages, it's just part of the print/packaging manufacturing process. At least I've certainly not experienced more issues with packages from Sire Press, I'd generally say less variation. The only issue I've ever had was with the printing on one project being a little dark, but it was more because of my design than their printing. Maybe the samples they sent weren't the best, I've never seen their samples, only all the projects I've used them for. I can't recommend them highly enough.
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Post by DrummerMan » Sun Sep 29, 2013 10:54 pm

Greg, I remember those black bottom cd-r's. Used to get them from that spot in Sunset Park Brooklyn ages ago, but I think they stopped making them. Not only did they look kind of cool, they were the most reliable cd-r's I ever used. Never had one come out glitchy...

Anyway. Thanks for all the thoughts on the matter. Kslight, what you're saying is kind of my point I think. I know I won't be getting professional replication at that volume but if doing it myself ends up costing about the same per unit and factor in the amount of time it will take me, plus the fact that I don't really have a decent printer, definitely not one that prints on cd's, I'd rather just spend that money on someone else doing a probably (if even only marginally) better job than me.
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dfuruta
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Post by dfuruta » Mon Sep 30, 2013 5:21 am

jgimbel wrote:Very strange. I've been doing graphic design (especially album artwork) for musicians for years, I've had at least a dozen projects that we've used Sire Press for (both printed and screen printed, one was for a Tape Op member, at that) and always had great results. Not all packages are totally perfect, but I've never had any place I've worked with give 100% perfect packages, it's just part of the print/packaging manufacturing process. At least I've certainly not experienced more issues with packages from Sire Press, I'd generally say less variation. The only issue I've ever had was with the printing on one project being a little dark, but it was more because of my design than their printing. Maybe the samples they sent weren't the best, I've never seen their samples, only all the projects I've used them for. I can't recommend them highly enough.
Huh, maybe they just chose bad samples. This was a year or two ago ago; maybe they've improved since.

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Waltz Mastering
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Post by Waltz Mastering » Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:53 am

DrummerMan wrote:Greg, I remember those black bottom cd-r's. Used to get them from that spot in Sunset Park Brooklyn ages ago, but I think they stopped making them. Not only did they look kind of cool, they were the most reliable cd-r's I ever used. Never had one come out glitchy...

Anyway. Thanks for all the thoughts on the matter. Kslight, what you're saying is kind of my point I think. I know I won't be getting professional replication at that volume but if doing it myself ends up costing about the same per unit and factor in the amount of time it will take me, plus the fact that I don't really have a decent printer, definitely not one that prints on cd's, I'd rather just spend that money on someone else doing a probably (if even only marginally) better job than me.
I've done countless jobs through http://www.discmakers.com/Quoter/cdpackages.aspx
with zero hassle..50 cds full jewel w/ polywrap dupe is $158

I've also had small jobs run through Kunaki with success. gl

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Post by dgrieser » Mon Oct 07, 2013 12:45 pm

I used www.bisondisc.com for the last CD I did. We got the CDs in sleeves, but they also do digipacks. Great personal service even though it seems like a big company. Great looking printing on the cover and CD and never had a problem with any disks. Everything got shipped by the dates they promised.

One of the reasons I used them was because I could upload the files, including the wav files. Most places want a master disk, and my laptop burner is a bit sketchy.

NFI.

The only CD I had returned with a "won't play" problem was done by kunaki. Won't ever use them again.

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Post by chorga1 » Wed Oct 23, 2013 3:20 pm

Go digital and put your tracks and pdfs of your press kit on a usb drive.


Customize it with a sticker - boom!

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