What's your method for auditioning sounds?

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LupineSound
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What's your method for auditioning sounds?

Post by LupineSound » Thu Jun 19, 2014 6:43 am

I don't have a control room (yet) so I wear a pair of sound isolating headphones (DT770m) and hold up a mic to the source and move it around until I find a sweet spot. Other times I'll set up a mic in a proven configuration, record a sample and play it back (adjust & repeat as needed).

I suppose the ideal would be to have a mic robot I could control from a control room. Failing that, a mic monkey/assistant. haha

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Nick Sevilla
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Re: What's your method for auditioning sounds?

Post by Nick Sevilla » Thu Jun 19, 2014 6:57 am

LupineSound wrote:I suppose the ideal would be to have a mic robot I could control from a control room.
I'm working on it...
Howling at the neighbors. Hoping they have more mic cables.

GlowSounds
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Re: What's your method for auditioning sounds?

Post by GlowSounds » Thu Jun 19, 2014 9:50 am

LupineSound wrote:I suppose the ideal would be to have a mic robot I could control from a control room.
That's called an intern

drumsound
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Post by drumsound » Fri Jun 20, 2014 4:05 pm

I start with what I assume is going to work, and then listen. I'm lucky as I have a control room. If I'm doing things alone, I record a bit and then listen. I make changes based on what I hear, if I"m not happy.

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A.David.MacKinnon
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Post by A.David.MacKinnon » Fri Jun 20, 2014 9:17 pm

^^^^^^^This.
Start with tools and techniques that have worked for you in the past. X mic on Y instrument. If that doesn't work move on to something else.
If you don't have a control room make sure you record a bit, listen to playback and then make changes.

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Post by jgimbel » Sun Jun 22, 2014 9:28 pm

Guess based on experience, then test. Adjust if needed. Your guesses get better as you gain more experience.
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MichaelAlan
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Re: What's your method for auditioning sounds?

Post by MichaelAlan » Tue Jun 24, 2014 8:05 am

Nick Sevilla wrote:
LupineSound wrote:I suppose the ideal would be to have a mic robot I could control from a control room.
I'm working on it...
Been waiting for one of these for years! I actually saw a vid on youtube of a guy who made one just for guitars... pretty sick.
All energy flows according to the whims of the great magnet...

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Zygomorph
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Post by Zygomorph » Tue Jun 24, 2014 1:14 pm

I use Etymotic headphones. If you need more isolation, you can wear more isolation over them. Except for the very lowest frequencies, which get transmitted through your body anyway, I've found I can have my head inside of a kick drum and still get an excellent sense of the sound. It also protects your hearing.

Another idea I've had, but never tried, is to put a delay of an appropriate length on the signal of interest. But there are details about this that would probably make it a rather finicky technique.

I might also add that that microscopic microphone positioning adjustments are more important if you're super close-miking things. With experience, you'll know what things can and can't be adjusted for with EQ, for example, so that you can balance that with time and other production concerns. If you don't have days and days of time to get the perfect tone on something, it's far more important to make sure the musicians are comfortable, playing well, and have confidence that good things are getting done.
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vvv
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Post by vvv » Tue Jun 24, 2014 5:34 pm

Re the robot, see here ...
bandcamp; vlayman;
THD; Geronimo Cowboys;
blog.
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