Good music movies

Discussion on new albums, developing listening skills, critical listening to others' work, as well as TOMB members' MP3 links, online recording critiques

Moderator: cgarges

Post Reply
RefD
on a wing and a prayer
Posts: 5993
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 9:10 pm

Post by RefD » Thu Aug 21, 2008 12:03 pm

Zoltar wrote:
RefD wrote:
Zoltar wrote:Hardcore Logo - documentary about a fictional band, like spinal tap, not as funny
well, 'This Is Spinal Tap' didn't have nearly the same degree of brutality and tragedy in it, for one.

we're apples and oranges here.
I don't remember much about Hardcore Logo, but is it was worse than the flaming drummers?
how about dismemberment and gunshot wounds to the head?

i'd rate those as worse.
?What need is there to weep over parts of life? The whole of it calls for tears.? -- Seneca

Zoltar
gettin' sounds
Posts: 132
Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2005 10:39 pm
Location: Ontario Canada

Post by Zoltar » Thu Aug 21, 2008 12:23 pm

RefD wrote:
Zoltar wrote:
RefD wrote:
Zoltar wrote:Hardcore Logo - documentary about a fictional band, like spinal tap, not as funny
well, 'This Is Spinal Tap' didn't have nearly the same degree of brutality and tragedy in it, for one.

we're apples and oranges here.
I don't remember much about Hardcore Logo, but is it was worse than the flaming drummers?
how about dismemberment and gunshot wounds to the head?

i'd rate those as worse.
I guess it depends on context.

now that you mention it, I remember expecting it to be like spinal tap, and I left the theater feeling quite unsettled.

RefD
on a wing and a prayer
Posts: 5993
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 9:10 pm

Post by RefD » Thu Aug 21, 2008 12:48 pm

Zoltar wrote:
RefD wrote:
Zoltar wrote:
RefD wrote:
Zoltar wrote:Hardcore Logo - documentary about a fictional band, like spinal tap, not as funny
well, 'This Is Spinal Tap' didn't have nearly the same degree of brutality and tragedy in it, for one.

we're apples and oranges here.
I don't remember much about Hardcore Logo, but is it was worse than the flaming drummers?
how about dismemberment and gunshot wounds to the head?

i'd rate those as worse.
I guess it depends on context.

now that you mention it, I remember expecting it to be like spinal tap, and I left the theater feeling quite unsettled.
what we need is a black metal version of 'This Is Spinal Tap'.
?What need is there to weep over parts of life? The whole of it calls for tears.? -- Seneca

User avatar
saint360
alignin' 24-trk
Posts: 64
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 9:32 pm

Post by saint360 » Thu Aug 21, 2008 6:43 pm

[/quote]Anybody actually dig the Flight of the Conchords music? I dig it. It is a radio/tv show, not a movie, but the music is worth listening to.[/quote]

Love Flight of the Conchords. I think several of the songs on their new album are stronger than the versions that appeared on the show, especially Business Time.

User avatar
on the moon
audio school graduate
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Feb 06, 2004 2:20 am
Location: florida

Post by on the moon » Tue Sep 23, 2008 9:47 pm

Urgh! A Music War
The Decline of Western Civilization
Tougher Than Leather
Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo
humming Neil Young's "OHIO"

User avatar
centurymantra
buyin' a studio
Posts: 916
Joined: Wed Nov 09, 2005 8:02 am
Location: Michigan
Contact:

Post by centurymantra » Sun Sep 28, 2008 10:02 am

I just saw "Electric Apricot: Quest for Festaroo", and have gotta say that this is soooooo great. This is a totally brilliant mock-umentary about the mishaps of a jam band - directed in fine form by Les Claypool, who also stars as the neurotic drummer of the band. You may have to be involved in music in some fashion to fully appreciate the film, but it is totally in the same league as Spinal Tap IMHO.

The lengthy segment in the recording studio is pure comedy gold and pretty much make it required viewing for TOMB denizens. Les totally nails it as an absurd perfectionist, with two hour time lapses reeling by as he takes the entire first day to set up his drum set, much to the chagrin of the engineers and band members....with his oft-repeated mantra of "you know, ya only make yer first record once!!" There's even some great recording engineer/studio inside joke type of references, complete with the sort of creepy assistant engineer getting into it with "Oz", the main engineer, over mic choices...

."are you sure you even want to use a D112"
"well, what would you want to use"
"i dunno - something...bigger?"

This film is awesome!
__________________

Bryan
Shoeshine Recording Studio
"Pop music is sterile, country music is sterile. That's one of the reasons I keep going back to baseball" - Doug Sahm

cgarges
zen recordist
Posts: 10865
Joined: Mon Jun 16, 2003 1:26 am
Location: Charlotte, NC
Contact:

Post by cgarges » Sun Sep 28, 2008 10:19 am

Someone just told me about that movie a coupe of days ago. Gotta check it out.

Chris Garges
Charlotte, NC

thousandshirts
audio school
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Aug 20, 2008 10:16 pm

Post by thousandshirts » Mon Sep 29, 2008 10:12 am

Kansas City (1996). Soundtrack for the Robert Altman film. Which, at times, seems to be scripted as an excuse to make a great soundtrack. No question, this soundtrack is great, and, has occupied the top of my soundtrack list since it's release in '96. I don't see anything else displacing it anytime soon. Plenty of people don't enjoy this style of music, though, so I don't get a lot of folks standing with me on this one. Come to think of it I am usually standing alone.

Sneakers (1992). My choice if I had to choose a film score that is born of the weird parallel universe that the Academy Awards inhabit. Nice work by Marsalis. The last James Horner score I like. Also had a great track by Mike Bloomfield ("Really," from the Super Sessions album, showing off what a great old Les Paul into a Blackface Super Reverb sounds like) near the start of the movie that isn't on the Soundtrack.

Slaughterhouse-Five (1972). Glenn Gould put this one together. Great usage of Variation 18 from the Goldbergs, as well as the largo from Bach's F minor Piano Concerto. Maybe this is here just because I liked the book, or because I like Glenn Gould, or Bach. But I thought it all came together nicely.

Touch Me, I'm Dick, by Citizen Dick -- notable because it opened the way for all of the massive modern bands to be in soundtracks. Not really a strong offering in many ways, but dammit, this is the People's Elbow of soundtracks. Before this soundtrack, nobody, or, almost nobody actually bought soundtracks (Singles, 1992). Except for that great uncle who collected soundtracks with extended clarinet solos.

Generally with the classic soundtracks you get a great theme, two at max, and then that's it. Strangers on the Shore, Somewhere my Love, etc.

User avatar
bipedal
alignin' 24-trk
Posts: 69
Joined: Thu Feb 08, 2007 11:21 am
Location: Western Mass now, Mpls then

Post by bipedal » Mon Sep 29, 2008 1:46 pm

Just stumbled across this thread -- great suggestions here, definitely some adds to my need-to-see list.

I may have missed it, but I didn't see the Fugazi documentary Instrument mentioned. One of my favorite films, a good history of the band and their m.o., some great live footage and from the studio sessions for Red Medicine. Grows a bit long at the end, but still recommended for fans and even casual admirers of Fugazi's work.

- Jay
I like recording stuff.
Bassist, guitarist, pedal builder, recovering music snob.

User avatar
theshaggyfreak
gimme a little kick & snare
Posts: 98
Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2005 4:41 am
Location: Centreville, VA
Contact:

Post by theshaggyfreak » Mon Sep 29, 2008 1:55 pm

Legend has been one of my favorite movies since I was younger. It was my introduction to Tangerine Dream of whom I'm a big fan of to this day.

Labyrinth is another great one. David Bowie + Trevor Jones + Jim Henson = greatness. While I knew of Bowie when this movie came out, this film really pushed my interest in his music.

User avatar
blackdiscoball
suffering 'studio suck'
Posts: 469
Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2005 5:32 pm

Post by blackdiscoball » Mon Sep 29, 2008 4:42 pm

I think any of those eaglevision classic album movies are great! I really like the Dark Side of the Moon one, the Zappa one is really great too.
myspace.com/blackdiscoballstudio/

jckinnick
buyin' a studio
Posts: 924
Joined: Fri May 26, 2006 2:50 pm

Post by jckinnick » Mon Sep 29, 2008 5:42 pm


stylus flanger
alignin' 24-trk
Posts: 58
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2006 9:08 pm

Post by stylus flanger » Mon Sep 29, 2008 7:11 pm

it is a tragedy that no one has mentioned THE LEGEND OF 1900. astonishing. do anything you can to see this. you will thank me.

User avatar
HeavyHand
takin' a dinner break
Posts: 157
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:49 pm
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Contact:

Post by HeavyHand » Mon Sep 29, 2008 10:01 pm

Once Upon a Time in the West
Gummo
Passion of Joan of Arc - Voice's of Light Score not sure if I'm able to separate the music for the film's power but it doesn't matter
Ok, who brought the dog? - Louis Tully
www.facebook.com/BigTerribleMusic

Harry
re-cappin' neve
Posts: 771
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2003 11:06 am
Location: South Bend, Indiana

Post by Harry » Tue Sep 30, 2008 6:46 am

Joe Strummer: The Future is Unwritten

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests