Question about corridors and shared drywall between rooms

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Greenlander
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Question about corridors and shared drywall between rooms

Post by Greenlander » Mon May 21, 2007 1:44 pm

I'm in the process of a build and have just realised I didn't take something into account. In this case, there are multiple rooms, sometimes adjoining each other. The rooms have their own studs, so they're all isolated in that respect with an airgap between the studs belonging to each individual room.

For corridors however, I intended to place the drywall on the outside of the stud belonging to a room. But this means that the drywall could create a flanking point between adjoining rooms i.e. a piece of drywall could connect two room by being connected to studs from two seperate rooms.

Is there any way to avoid that short of building the corridor walls on seperate studs? All I can think of is to make sure the drywall splits between room with caulk running down the split? Leaving a gap would mean that extra sound leaks into the corridor, which doesn't seem desirable either.

Hopefully I've explained this sufficiently. Any ideas?
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Post by leftofthedial » Mon May 21, 2007 2:37 pm

You may choose to use a staggerd stud installation on the hallway walls. Although, that really isn't much different than building another wall, but it will save you about 3 inches of hallways space and framing doors up on 2x6 studs is easier than 2 2x4 walls with an airgap
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Post by Greenlander » Mon May 21, 2007 2:52 pm

leftofthedial wrote:You may choose to use a staggerd stud installation on the hallway walls. Although, that really isn't much different than building another wall, but it will save you about 3 inches of hallways space and framing doors up on 2x6 studs is easier than 2 2x4 walls with an airgap
Thanks, but I don't think that offers any kind of solution, since it still leaves the drywall in the corridors creating a flanking path between rooms. So the issue remains with that solution.
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Post by leftofthedial » Mon May 21, 2007 2:59 pm

Well, the theory of staggerd stud construction is to reduce transmission between two rooms while still sharing the same framing vs. building 2 separate walls. So the solution I have in my mind, seems like the best compromise based on both of your concerns, not just one or the other. Draw it on paper, and I think you'll see the benefit.
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Post by Greenlander » Mon May 21, 2007 3:35 pm

leftofthedial wrote:Well, the theory of staggerd stud construction is to reduce transmission between two rooms while still sharing the same framing vs. building 2 separate walls. So the solution I have in my mind, seems like the best compromise based on both of your concerns, not just one or the other. Draw it on paper, and I think you'll see the benefit.
I appreciate the input, but I think you're barking up the wrong tree, as they say. I'm very familar with the staggered stud method and I understand completely how it puts the outer drywall on one of the staggered sides. However, it doesn't really deal with the issue I'm talking about, which concerns the drywall linking the rooms together.

I'm convinced there's a fix for this, because many people create their rooms this way without having a second set of studs for the corridor walls. Of course most people probably just leave the drywall as a flanking path, I'm sure it isn't dramatic or anything, but I'd like to eliminate it if I could. As I said, I was thinking a caulked small gap, but that's a wild guess. Does anyone else have any ideas?
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Post by leftofthedial » Mon May 21, 2007 3:52 pm

Are you talking backwall to backwall via the corridor?
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Post by Greenlander » Mon May 21, 2007 6:21 pm

Here's a quick sketchup:

Image

Imagine you're seeing two rooms and their individual studs adjoining each other. The blue represents a piece of drywall in the corridor running along the outside of the rooms. It's linked to studs in both rooms and therefore creates a flanking path. One way to stop that would be to cut the drywall between the rooms, but that lets extra noise into the corridor, so I don't think that's a solution either. Which is why I mentioned caulking.
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Post by JWL » Mon May 21, 2007 7:02 pm

I think you need to decide: is it better to have a flanking path, and therefore increased noise, between the 2 rooms, or is it better to have a quiet hallway?

If I understnad you correctly I'd go for the better noise between the rooms, and not worry about the hallway.

Get rid of the final piece of sheetrock straddling the 2 frames. If you need to cover that space with something, you could use some cloth or something that doesn't have much mass.

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Re: Question about corridors and shared drywall between room

Post by Rod Gervais » Tue May 22, 2007 5:38 am

Greenlander wrote:Is there any way to avoid that short of building the corridor walls on seperate studs? All I can think of is to make sure the drywall splits between room with caulk running down the split? Leaving a gap would mean that extra sound leaks into the corridor, which doesn't seem desirable either.
Green,

you're on the right track.

End the corridor wall to finish flush with each inside wall - that will leave the same air gap at the joint as the 2 walls have between them.

When you drywall the corridor - fill the joint between the 2 studs with rockwool (thermafiber) but don't pack it rock hard - you want about 40% compression with a 4pcf rockwool.

Do a nice neat joint on the drywall of 3/8" and use backer rod and caulk to finish the joint - do the same for the 2nd layer of drywall.

That will give you the best you can acheive without creating a flanking problem.

Sincerely,

Rod
Last edited by Rod Gervais on Wed May 23, 2007 6:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Greenlander » Wed May 23, 2007 4:20 pm

That all makes sense, thanks Rod.
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